Spring Forward With Fruits and Vegetables

Now that you’ve finished up the big meal from the Spring holiday, let’s get the folks who strayed from their best laid “healthy” eating plan back on track. In this season of fresh tender vegetables and richly flavored fruits, these food groups come with plenty of the right stuff. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables are an aid in maintaining good health. A produce-filled diet can lower blood pressure, reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, prevent some types of cancer, lower the risk of eye and digestive problems, and have a positive effect upon blood sugar which can help you monitor your appetite and avoid overeating.

According to research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) only one out of ten Americans eats enough fruits and vegetables. Consumption varies throughout the country, however all regions fall short of recommended goals. The federal recommendation for fruit is 1-1/2 to 2 cups a day while vegetables weigh in at 2 to 3 cups daily. How much is enough? If you eat one banana and one-half apple, you’ve met your fruit goal. You can knock out the veggie recommendations by adding a side salad or slaw with lunch and two vegetables with dinner. It is easy and this is the season when we start to see more of the fresh items that have been out of season. Although most fresh produce can be found year ’round, the price is generally better when they’re in season. And remember you can use canned, frozen or dried produce e to eat the amounts recommended each day.

In addition to the perennial favorites of asparagus, artichokes, chives, strawberries and grapefruit, I’m sharing information on in-season choices that may not be top-of-mind. One of my goals is to share options and encourage you to eat from a variety of foods to make a colorful plate.

New Potatoes are often red-skinned, small and freshly harvested. You can find them in the market April to July. They retain their shape when cooking and are a sweeter potato because their sugar content is not converted to starch yet. They are a good source of Vitamin C, and low in fat and calories. They also contain antioxidants which can help prevent hypertension and protect against heart disease and cancer.

Snap Peas are in the legume family. They are in the market March to June. The crisp pea pods do not require shucking before cooking and are a wealth of vitamins and minerals that are beneficial to both bone and heart health. They contain Vitamins A, C, B6, folate and vitamin K. These peas are low in calories and are a source of fiber.

Cara Cara Oranges are available December through April. These sweet and tangy oranges are seedless which makes them very easy to use as a snack or in salads. They are high in vitamin C with a reddish-pink flesh. The flavor is similar to strawberries and cranberries.

Kumquats are miniature oval-shaped oranges, which have a thin sweet skin that can be eaten. They also contain seeds which you will want to avoid because they are bitter; remove them before eating or cooking. They’re available January to June and make a great snack or addition to breads and muffins. This bite-size citrus is a good source of dietary fiber; vitamins C and A. Eight whole kumquats contain just 18 calories.

As you increase the fruits and vegetables in your daily diet, consider these foods and try new varieties found at the supermarket. As you try new items, think of them as samples-you just may like them enough to add to your menu often.

Travel and Tourism Degree and Certificate Options

Enrollment in an accredited school or college can help you find your way to an exciting career. There are different opportunities available to help prepare for numerous professions inside the field of travel and tourism. Studies can be completed at various levels to allow for the training to meet your individual needs and goals. Enrollment options will vary by educational training program, but will help you to enter the same careers. By learning more about travel and tourism degree and certificate options, you can begin training for the career of your dreams.

Education

Different higher education programs offer training in travel and tourism to help prepare you for an exciting career. Studies can be completed at the certificate, associate, bachelor, and master degree levels. Coursework and training can vary but will typically require up to one year for certificate programs. Associate degree programs can take two years to complete. Bachelor degrees will require four years of training, and master degree programs will take an additional two years of study. Training can be completed in order to carry out tasks assisting travelers with reservations, cruises, and much more. You can start by enrolling in a program and discovering the available careers.

Careers

There are many different career choices available for you to choose from when looking to become a professional in his field. accredited studies will help you obtain the information that is needed to work in a variety of places. You can look forward to entering the workforce as a professional:

Travel Clerk
Travel and Tourism Manager
Travel Agents
Travel Coordinators
…and many other related hospitality professions.

Opportunities for employment include working in hotels, property management companies, reservation departments, and various other businesses. By enrolling in an accredited educational training program you can prepare for the career of your dreams by studying various subjects.

Coursework

Training will cover a variety of topics that are related to the level of education being pursued as well as the desired career. You can expect to learn hospitality, accounting, travel destinations, and many other courses related to the field. With an accredited training center you can study bookkeeping, reservation systems, sales techniques, transportation, and more. Training will cover different topics to allow you the chance to receive the quality education that you deserve. Start the path to a new career and find a program that fits your needs and goals.

Summer, Travel and Medication – Part 6 – Motion Sickness and Jetlag

For extra sensitive persons prevention of motion sickness through medication can be considered. H1-antihistamines, having an anti-emetic effect are used for this purpose. They have to be taken ½ to 1 hour before the journey starts and in longer travels it can be considered to take an extra dose after six hours. It is very important to stress that these types of medication cannot be taken by pregnant women. Small children under the age of two years should not be given any anti motion sickness medication either. It is a fact that motion sickness does not regularly occur in young children any way. Be very careful as well when driving a vehicle when under the influence of the medication: it has a very sedative affect and you could fall asleep behind the wheel of your car. Same restrictions apply if you are working with heavy power tools: the danger here is that the medication affects your ability to concentrate, with possible serious accidents as a consequence.

Jet Lag

A recent article in The Lancet shows once again that there is no one remedy to counteract or prevent jet lag. Some people advice melatonin, next to a lot of measures, not involving medication. There is a lot of conflicting evidence to be found when researching the effects of melatonin on jet lag. Sometimes a favorable effect is reported in the scientific literature and sometimes no effects at all are reported. What to think about that? Fact is however that there is very little known about the safety of using melatonin. Some studies show it to have an effect on the medication that prevents the blood from coagulating prematurely. Some countries have banned the use of melatonin in drugs all together. So as always: when in doubt consult your family doctor who will advise you what best to do.

This was part 6 of a series of 6 articles about travel and medication. The other parts being: Part 1 Vaccinations – Part 2 Travelers diarrhea – Part 3 Lyme’s disease – Part 4 mountain sickness and heat stroke – Part 5 Malaria – Part 6 motion sickness and jet lag.